Statement Regarding the ANTIFA Terrorist Declaration

Good Evening,

As we reflect upon the anniversary of D-Day (address on that event can be found under Addresses) and the defeat of fascism on the world landscape, I find this to be a prudent time to release a statement regarding the declaration of terroristic intent against ANTIFA. Of course, we have now all overheard a term which has direct correlation with fascism by this point in modern times.

Fascism is defined as a form of far-right, authoritarian ultra nationalism characterized by dictatorial power, forcible suppression of opposition, as well as strong regimentation of society and of the economy. This form of dictatorship came to prominence in early 20th-century Europe. An example of a fascist leader would be the staple head of that movement itself: Italian Prime Minister Benito Mussolini. Mussolini is reflected upon historically as the right-hand of Adolf Hitler in leading the Axis powers. By reflecting upon Mussolini alone, I feel that it is evident that fascism is not acceptable in any sense of the imagination. And so, the target placed upon a group such as ANTIFA for the chaos playing out on our streets today is preposterous. The truth of the matter is that ANTIFA is not a collective group, rather a loose collection of local/regional groups and individuals. This essentially makes the declaration of ANTIFA as a terrorist group ineffective.

The violence is posed by groups which embrace violent tactics to suppress opposition. ANTIFA, while potentially integrated in the fold on the outset, is intended to be a scapegoat for the federal government to place blame upon. This declaration, as previously mentioned, will not lead to the deescalation of riots and vandalism. In principle, all Americans are likely to declare fascism as treacherous and a threat to our democracy itself. And yet, to condemn ANTIFA as a terroristic affiliation when no group formally exists? I cannot express my level of displeasure with this proclamation. Not only is the federal branch looking for an obscure place to assess blame, they also are avoiding the issues we are pressed with all together. I am not one to outright condemn any one person or group for their inability to grasp the gravity of a situation, but in this case, I have no other alternative. This issue is prominent, and will not simply die out. Mr. President, it is time to act. You are the President of the United States of America. You must stop tarnishing the reputation of the office itself by your complete inaction in a time of disaster. I am not talking policy at this point, I am talking outright morals, the intrinsic variance between right and wrong as we know in our consciences. What do you plan to do about this crisis, Mr. President? What reform do you propose we place forward to address the issue of police brutality? What speech will you deliver to put protestors at ease? What symbolic gesture are you willing to preform in order to illustrate that you hear the cries of millions of American citizens? Mr. President, you have had three weeks to show one once of sympathy, to show that you care about the Floyd family, to depict your awareness of the injustices faced by African American communities, to make an appearance at a public gathering which mourns the loss of Mr. Floyd while reflecting upon the issues faced by thousands of communities scattered throughout our great country. Mr. President, in case you have not taken notice of this obvious fact, you have failed to preform any one of those actions.

Let me reflect upon a time in 2015, when incumbent President Obama marched with a large crowd to reflect upon the granting of voting rights to African Americans. Let me reflect upon a time in 2020, when several state governors marched with protestors in an effort to bring awareness to the need of common sense police reform. Let me reflect upon a time in 2020 when the Democratic nominee for President Joe Biden walked the streets of Delaware to access the damage caused riots, and went on to listen to members of the African American community in a nearby church. Policy aside, all of these officials heard the collective cry for help, and stood in solidarity with them. These public servants wished to show solidarity with the protestors. Now let me reflect upon a time in 2020 when the President issued a statement on Twitter, calling protestors “thugs” and uttered the racially-insensitve statement, with history dating back to the Civil War, “when the looting starts, the shooting starts”. The point in this reflection is not necessarily intended to compare which servants present themselves with decorum or ‘act like a President’. The point in this comparison is to illustrate what a public servant is expected to do when holding office: listen to their constituents, regardless of their affiliation or support level. The term public servant indicates that you must be beholden to the interest of the majority of your constituents, not just your political base and donors. I certainly hope that we have not lost sight of that basic, democratic initiative.

I leave you with one final point: when you enter the ballot box on election day, and on any election day to clarify, you will ponder one question to yourself. President Ronald Reagan had conjured up this proposition in his election bid in 1980, and I find this to be a very basic, yet vital consideration that each voter must consider prior to bubbling in your choice as to who best represents the interest of America’s future. President Reagan stated, “Are you better off than you were four years ago? Is there more or less unemployment…than there was four years ago?” I pose those questions to you in this election before you make your choice. Carefully consider every variable which accompanies every candidate. Also give consideration to third party candidates and independents if the ‘lesser of two evils’ argument is unappealing to you. The one thing I encourage every eligible voter to avoid, however, is not voting at all. The easiest way to voice your opinion in this democracy is through your vote, and so at that, why wouldn’t you want your opinion to hold weight. Regardless of whether people appreciate your views, they are meaningful because they show that you care, that you can compose your own, unique opinions on complex matters. Perhaps the greatest accomplishment of voicing your opinion is the very fact that you can form one in a time when the electorate is so easily swayed and buys into every narrative at a whim. Irrespective of whether I personally agree with someone, I respect their view as they know what they stand for and express it openly. I will always respect that, and I hope you all can as well. In a society where name smearing has gone rampant, I find that the value in meaningful conversion and compromise has skyrocketed.

– C. Lewis

Reform: Policing (2020)

I would like to offer my personal platform which begins to break the ice of reform on at least one issue: police reform. In my personal opinion, I interpret a lot of this protest referendum is centered around reforming policing in a 21st century approach. I also acknowledge that it focuses upon systemic disadvantages faced by minorities, but I would prefer to release my platform on that at a later time as it is much more detail-intensive and, plainly, covers many industries in one heading, so to speak. With that all being said, I will layout a 10-step, common sense reform strategy on the topic of policing.

First and foremost, I must credit all the content in this plan to Campaign Zero, a sub-movement of the Black Lives Matter Movement. They have done a phenomenal job in their research and I wholeheartedly agree with all of these ten points. They deserve a great amount of praise, and I believe that all of these points will be implemented, hopefully sooner rather than later. With that being said, I will break the strategy down, and you can also follow along in their graphic depicting it here:

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Here is my personal interpretation on how this helps advance the goal of racial equality:

  1. “A decades-long focus on policing minor crimes and activities – a practice called Broken Windows policing – has led to the criminalization and over-policing of communities of color and excessive force in otherwise harmless situations. In 2014, police killed at least 287 people who were involved in minor offenses and harmless activities like sleeping in parks, possessing drugs, looking “suspicious” or having a mental health crisis. These activities are often symptoms of underlying issues of drug addiction, homelessness, and mental illness which should be treated by healthcare professionals and social workers rather than the police.” This proposal would effectively end the senseless killings of all peoples, regardless of race, as a result of misdemeanor crimes where rehabilitation or assistance would be provided over prison time. Also reallocates the focus back upon the major crimes committed in society, where it always should have been. Go to https://www.joincampaignzero.org/brokenwindows to find out how we can permanently dismantle this putrid practice.
  2. “Police usually investigate and decide what, if any, consequences their fellow officers should face in cases of police misconduct. Under this system, fewer than 1 in every 12 complaints of police misconduct nationwide results in some kind of disciplinary action against the officer(s) responsible. Communities need an urgent way to ensure police officers are held accountable for police violence.” Oversight is always warranted in major affairs, be it politics or big business. This proposal would provide community oversight of police, a long needed policy. Go to https://www.joincampaignzero.org/oversight to find out how we can establish oversight in every community in America.
  3. “Police should have the skills and cultural competence to protect and serve our communities without killing people – just as police do in England, Germany, Japan and other developed countries. In 2014, police killed at least 253 unarmed people and 91 people who were stopped for mere traffic violations. The following policy solutions can restrict the police from using excessive force in everyday interactions with civilians.” Although this initially seems like the most erroneous and unachievable policy on the list, it can be done. Needless to say, if we implement this policy, we can make significant progress to reduce the number of killings due to police brutality. Go to www.joincampaignzero.org/force to see the specifics.
  4. “Local prosecutors rely on local police departments to gather the evidence and testimony they need to successfully prosecute criminals. This makes it hard for them to investigate and prosecute the same police officers in cases of police violence. These cases should not rely on the police to investigate themselves and should not be prosecuted by someone who has an incentive to protect the police officers involved.” Independent investigations are done on behalf of business leaders. Why can’t we take a similar approach to investigating crooked cops? The truth is we can. Go to https://www.joincampaignzero.org/investigations to find out how.
  5. “While white men represent less than one third of the U.S. population, they comprise about two thirds of U.S. police officers. The police should reflect and be responsive to the cultural, racial and gender diversity of the communities they are supposed to serve. Moreover, research shows police departments with more black officers are less likely to kill black people.” Whilst I do not give any support to identity politics overall, I do believe that representation that reflects the diversity of the community will enhance the trust between these parties. As such, I do support the policies laid out on https://www.joincampaignzero.org/representation.
  6. “While they are not a cure-all, body cameras and cell phone video have illuminated cases of police violence and have shown to be important tools for holding officers accountable. Nearly every case where a police officer was charged with a crime for killing a civilian in 2015 relied on video evidence showing the officer’s actions.” Evidence is not tangible when it is blatantly obvious that a crime has been committed. As such, we must ensure that body cameras are kept on at all points during an officers shift. Go to https://www.joincampaignzero.org/film-the-police to find out how we can ensure all injustices are captured on camera.
  7. “The current training regime for police officers fails to effectively teach them how to interact with our communities in a way that protects and preserves life. For example, police recruits spend 58 hours learning how to shoot firearms and only 8 hours learning how to deescalate situations. An intensive training regime is needed to help police officers learn the behaviors and skills to interact appropriately with communities.” These statistics are absolutely flooring and should not be taken lightly. We must ensure that our next generation of cops are given training in the order that save lives, not taking them. In no world is it sensible to spend 4 times the amount of time training officers how to shoot a gun than how to keep a situation calm. Go to https://www.joincampaignzero.org/train to see how we can right the ship.
  8. ” Police should be working to keep people safe, not contributing to a system that profits from stopping, searching, ticketing, arresting and incarcerating people.” In a similar fashion to the military industrial complex, for profit policing benefits at the cost of citizens. And as it’s been made clear, minorities are often targeted by these officers, who stereotype them as the predominant wrongdoers in society. Go to https://www.joincampaignzero.org/end-policing-for-profit to find out how we can end this abhorrent practice.
  9. “The events in Ferguson have introduced the nation to the ways that local police departments can misuse military weaponry to intimidate and repress communities. In 2014, militarized SWAT teams killed at least 38 people and studies show that more militarized police departments are significantly more likely to kill civilians. The following policies limit police departments from obtaining or using these weapons on our streets.” We got a lot of things dead wrong in the aftermath of Ferguson (2014), and the idea of recycling used military equipment in lower ranking offices such as SWAT teams have not enhanced our position in any way. If military-esque teams are necessary, then deploy military troops themselves, or the National Guard for that matter. Military equipment in your local police department is unnecessary and costs lives. Go to https://www.joincampaignzero.org/demilitarization to find out how we can roll back this procedure.
  10. “Police unions have used their influence to establish unfair protections for police officers in their contracts with local, state and federal government and in statewide Law Enforcement Officers’ Bills of Rights. These provisions create one set of rules for police and another for civilians, and make it difficult for Police Chiefs or civilian oversight structures to punish police officers who are unfit to serve. Learn more about how police union contracts help officers avoid accountability here.” Union rights is an in-depth topic which requires much explanation. What needs no explanation, however, is how to charge a criminal. Just because a person accused of murder is a former police officer does not mean he or she should be granted special privileges. It is time to put an end to these privileges, which undermine our very system. Go to https://www.joincampaignzero.org/contracts to find out how we can ensure all criminals are prosecuted as such.

I cannot explain how instrumental the Campaign Zero initiative was in terms of forming my policy platform in a coherent manner. I encourage all readers to go to their website at https://www.joincampaignzero.org/ and even make a donation if you could to help advance their movement. Their proposals are not radical, they are common sense. I encourage all incumbent politicians to adopt this platform as I have to move closer towards racial equality all while reforming policing in a productive manner.